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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Den Sorte Haette

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Den Sorte Haette (1911)

Den Sorte Haette (The Black Hood) is a Danish silent movie released in 1911, produced by Nordisk Film Co., starring Lauritz Olsen as Sherlock Holmes. Black & White.

Other titles:

  • The Black Hood
  • The Conspirators (USA) 16-30 september 1911

Survival status: presumed lost.



Cast

  • Sherlock Holmes : Lauritz Olsen
  • Mr. Wilson : unknown
  • Mrs. Wilson : unknown
  • Benjamin Carter : unknown
  • Harry Clark : unknown


Photos


Plot summary

The Moving Picture World, 16 september 1911, p. 830
  • The Moving Picture World, 16 september 1911, p. 830

THE CONSPIRATORS (Sept. 16). — Mr. Wilson, a solicitor, receives a wire from a client who is a continued invalid, asking him to call upon him and arrange tor the disposal of his stocks and shares. When the wire arrives. Mrs. Wilson is at the office. Bidding adieu to her, her husband accompanies accompanies her to the street. His clerk, who is a member of a noted gang of scoundrels, during his absence reads the telegram and hastily prepares message to the gang, apprising them that there is a good haul to be made. His first epistle does not suit him, and he crumples this up and throws it on the floor. This ultimately brings about his undoing. The clerk leaves the office and joins his confederates, and soon their plans are matured. As Mr. Wilson is hailing a cab preparatory to calling on ills client, the gang overpower him and confine him in a dungeon at old Mother S's. Armed with his employer's bag, the clerk then proceeds to call on the client. At the solicitor's office, however, a trusted servant has picked up the incriminating note which says that Wilson must be robbed. He Informs Mrs. Wilson, and then Sherlock Holmes Is called in. He speedily determines on a course of action, and going to the client, takes that gentleman's place, and is disguised to represent the infirm old man. When the clerk calls, Sherlock Holmes overpowers him, and makes him a prisoner. He then disguises himself as the clerk, and goes to the place where Wilson is detained, and liberates him. The other members of the gang rush in, but are covered by the detective's pistols. Suddenly one of them pulls a cord by the window and Sherlock Holmes disappears into space below. But the police arrive and overpower the ruffians. They are forced to disclose Holmes's whereabouts, and eventually the robbers are consigned to durance vile, and Wilson is restored to his family.


Reviews

The Moving Picture World, 30 september 1911, p. 976
  • The Moving Picture World, 30 september 1911, p. 976

"The Conspirators" (Great Northern), September 16. — A Sherlock Holmes detective story which has a number of thrilling situations. Perhaps the most interesting is where the robbers pull a string and drop the detective into some place unknown. However, he is speedily rescued by the police, the gang is captured and the unfortunate lawyer is returned to him family unhurt. And all this came about through the arch conspirator neglecting to throw away a telegram he had written to send to his confederates. The assumption of a number of different disguises by the detective is a clever bit of work and adds greatly to the interest of the film.




The Moving Picture World, 30 september 1911, p. 1000
  • The Moving Picture World, 30 september 1911, p. 1000

THE CONSPIRATORS (Sept. 30). — Mr. Wilson, an attorney-at-law, receives a communication from a client, a millionaire, Benjamin Carter, who is a confirmed invalid. He is requested to call as quickly as possible to arrange for the sale of his client's stocks and bounds. His secretary, Harry Clark, who is a member of a gang of nefarious scoundrels, during his absence, reads the letter Carter and hastily prepares a message to his associates, apprising them that there is an opportunity for a good haul. His first message does not suit him, and he crumples this up and throws it on the door. This ultimately brings about his undoing. The secretary leaves the office and joins his confederates, and soon their plans for action are matured. As Mr. Wilson is hailing a cab, preparatory to calling on his client, the gang overpower him and confine him in the premises of old mother S's, in Dock Street. Armed with his employer's bag, the secretary then proceeds to call on Carter. At the lawyer's office, however, a trusted servant has picked up the incriminating note, which says that Wilson must be detained. He immediately informs Mrs. Wilson, who at once summons Sherlock Holmes. Holmes speedily determines a course of action, and going to the client, takes that gentleman's place, disguising himself to represent the infirm old millionaire. When the secretary calls, Sherlock Holmes overpowers him, making him a prisoner, after which he proceeds to the place where Wilson is detained. Other members of the gang rush in, but are covered by the detective's pistols. Suddenly, one of them pulls a cord by the window and Sherlock Holmes disappears into space below. Just then the police arrive, and after a struggle, finally overpower the ruffians. They are forced to disclose Holmes' whereabouts, and eventually the prisoners are led away for safe keeping and Wilson is happily restored to his family.




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