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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Irish Compromise (20 july 1914)

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Irish Compromise is a letter written by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in The Times on 20 july 1914.

See also his first letter on the same topic: Irish Compromise.


Irish Compromise

The Times (20 july 1914)

CONCESSION AS THE ALTERNATIVE TO FORCE.

SIR A. CONAN DOYLE'S VIEWS.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES.

Sir, — I ventured to suggest in your columns a possible division of Ireland (we would hope a temporary one) which might satisfy moderate and reasonable men of both parties. In such a division I proposed that the counties of Cavan and Monaghan should be taken from Ulster as being preponderantly Catholic and therefore a source of weakness rather than of strength to Ulster. I argued, however, that the isolated position of Donegal made it almost impossible to unite it to Ireland. To this Mr. Hugh Law and Mr. Swift MacNeill take exception. I would remind them, however, first, that if Nationalist Donegal remains with Ulster large numbers of Unionists in Dublin and other parts remain with Ireland ; secondly, that in case of a movement within Ulster to reunite her to Ireland it would be much to the advantage of Ireland to have at least one predominantly Catholic county included in Ulster.

The situation is one which must end either in concessions or in violence. The latter can bring nothing but misery and loss to Ireland, and would in all probability leave the question still unsolved. If Ulster be staked off in peace she may some day pull the stakes up of her own free will. But if she has to fight for a separate existence she will be for ever lost to Ireland. The highest service one can do Ireland is to counsel moderation and reasonable concession.

Yours faithfully,

ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE.
Windlesham, Crowborough, Sussex.








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