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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Kent Coal

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Kent Coal is a letter written by Arthur Conan Doyle published in the The Pall Mall Gazette on 26 february 1914.



Editions


Kent Coal (extract from Herne Bay Press)

Herne Bay Press
(7 march 1914, p. 3)


SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE'S ARTICLE.

An article on Kent Coal, written by Sir Conan Doyle, appeared in the "Pall Mall Gazette" last week.

Speaking of the amount of coal that Tilmanstone is raising (over 2,500 tons a week), Sir Conan Doyle says:

« It is certain that what Tilmanstone has done to-day every mine within the Kent Concessions area, and possibly several beyond it, will assuredly do. It means a great rich active coal field in the historical Cinque port corner of Kent.

« But this is only a bare statement of the first effect. Let us look further. Iron-stone pervades the neighbouring districts. The old iron industry of the South, which gave Queen Bess her cannon and St. Paul's its railings, will be revived again. Fireclay is there in great quantities, and a pottery industry will be established. Electricity works will be instituted close to the coal mines, and they in turn will give cheap power and attract industries from London. From all over England there will be a migration to East Kent of miners, iron men, potters, and artisans. The population will increase many-fold, and will utterly alter its character. And a great port will arise which will carry all this traffic to London on the one side, and to the world on the other. This port may be Dover or it may be Sandwich, or some new, more energetic competitor may arise, but assuredly a city of the first order — a Cardiff at the least — will rise in the south-east. All these things are as certain to come to pass as to-morrow's sun to rise. Nothing can prevent it. »








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