The Arthur Conan Doyle EncyclopediaThe Arthur Conan Doyle EncyclopediaThe Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia
22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Lippincott's Magazine

From The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Lippincott's Magazine (february 1890)
US version (25 cents)
Lippincott's Magazine (february 1890)
UK version (one shilling)

Lippincott's Monthly Magazine was an American monthly magazine published in Philadelphia by J. B. Lippincott & Co. from 1868 to 1915, when it relocated to New York to become McBride's Magazine. It merged with Scribner's Magazine in 1916. In UK, it was published by Ward, Lock & Co.

Arthur Conan Doyle described how he was commissioned to write the story over a dinner with Joseph M. Stoddart, managing editor of the Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, at the Langham Hotel in London on 30 August 1889. Stoddart wanted to produce an English version of Lippincott's with a British editor and British contributors. The dinner was also attended by Oscar Wilde, who eventually contributed The Picture of Dorian Gray in the July 1890 issue. Doyle discussed what he called this "golden evening" in his 1924 autobiography Memories and Adventures.

The novel first appeared in the February 1890 edition of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine as The Sign of the Four; or The Problem of the Sholtos, appearing in both London and Philadelphia. The British edition of the magazine originally sold for a shilling, and the American for 25 cents.


Conan Doyle in Lippincott's Magazine

1890


















© arthur-conan-doyle.com