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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

More Maiming at Great Wyrley

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More Maiming at Great Wyrley is a series of 5 articles published in the Daily Mail on 28 august 1907, including a part of an interview with Arthur Conan Doyle.



Sir A. Conan Doyle's Views

Daily Mail (28 august 1907, p. 7)

CONVINCED HE KNOWS THE CRIMINAL.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who so ably championed the cause of Mr. Edalji, is fully convinced that he knows the perpetrator of the outrages.

"I am not at all surprised at these new outrages occurring, for to the best of my belief the man who committed the original outrages is still living at Great Wyrley," said Sir Arthur to a representative of the "Daily Mail" yesterday. "I have the most conclusive evidence that he is a degenerate of a destructive and criminal type, a man who all his life destroyed things for the mere pleasure of destruction, and, further, I am sure there have been other outrages that have been put down to quite different causes.

"For instance, some time after Edalji was sent to prison a horse was found maimed in a field, but the police attributed the injuries to broken glass, and so gave an innocent turn to the affair. Last week there was another case which was put down to a cow's horn. It is a curious coincidence that such a series of accidents should occur in the same parish. Besides, a cow has usually two horns, and a trace of the other would have been found, if only a graze.

"The one course now by which the police can set themselves right is to admit frankly that in the first instance they made a very grave mistake, and then set to work not to explain away every fresh outrage, as they have endeavoured to do, but to try to find one single criminal on whom they can fix the guilt of the whole series. When they have done that they will find it is the work of the man who wrote the letters; of that I am ready to convince any reasonable person in the course of a half-hour's examination of the evidence.

"I need hardly say that I am not in the least disheartened, and that I have not the faintest doubt that the whole truth will one day come out, when it will be found to be exactly as I have described it."


All articles

Daily Mail (28 august 1907, p. 7)







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