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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, KStJ, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Sherlockinette Ousts Bunny Hug and Turkey Trot

From The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia

Sherlockinette Ousts Bunny Hug and Turkey Trot is an article published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on 1 april 1912.


Sherlockinette Ousts Bunny Hug and Turkey Trot

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (1 april 1912, p. 41)

American Girl Dances Herself Ill in Paris and Is Invalid.

PARIS, April 13. — A new dance is the rage in Paris. It is called the Sherlockinette.

As the name implies, it is an attempt to portray in the rhythm of slow waltz the movements of Sherlock Holmes in his search of the criminal. This dance was invented by the International Academy of Dance Professors, who say the bunny hug and turkey trot have become obsolete.

In the "Sherlockinette" they have endeavored to substitute a modification of the dance des Apache with some of the violence left out.

American girls who can dance the turkey trot, bunny hug and other American importations have been in great demand in Paris ballrooms this winter. Whenever several couples would appear who knew these dances the other dancers would surrender the floor to them, applauding until the dancers were exhausted.

One girl who is very popular in the American colony has fallen a victim to these dances, having performed them with so much ardor that she became ill. A specialist she consulted told her she had a strained heart and would be unable to dance again this season, and that she had so seriously injured herself she may never be able to appear again on a ballroom floor. She has been forbidden all exercise except short walks until her heart regains its strength.

As this young lady is well known in Paris, her unfortunate case has caused considerable comment, with the result that these American dances have passed out of favor in Parisian society.








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