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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, KStJ, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Speech at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds Meeting

From The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia

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On 5 march 1914, at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds meeting held at the Westminster Palace Hotel (London), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle gave a speech.



Attendees

  • President : Right Hon. Lord Newton
  • Presents :
  • Duchess of Portland
  • H.H. the Ranee of Sarawak
  • Duchess of Somerset
  • Countess von Hahne
  • Lord Lilford
  • Hon. Mrs. Drewitt
  • Major the Hon. Henry Guest, M.P.
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Sir Herbert Maxwell
  • Sir John Cockburn
  • Mr. Montagu Sharpe
  • Lady Forester
  • Major Boyd Horsbrugh
  • Mrs. Williamson
  • Mr. Ernest Bell
  • Mr. W. H. Hudson
  • Miss Clifton
  • Mr. Hahnemann Stuart
  • Dr. Drewitt
  • Mr. E. G. B. Meade-Waldo
  • Mr. W. R. Ogilvie-Grant
  • Mr. Page Croft, M.P.
  • Miss E. L. Turner
  • Mr. J. R. B. Masefield
  • Mr. W. P. Pycraft
  • Mrs. Burdon
  • Mr. F. W. Headley
  • Mr. C. E. Fagan
  • Mrs. Hesketh-Prichard
  • Mrs. Yorke Smith


Conan Doyle speech

Report from The Times

Mr. Page Croft, M.P., moved a resolution expressing hearty sympathy with the Government Bill for prohibiting the importation of the skins and plumage of wild birds for millinery purposes, urging the speedy passing of the measure through both Houses of Parliament, and directing that copies of the resolution be sent to the Prime Minister, and to the Right Hon. C. E. Hobhouse, M.P., who was in charge of the Bill. He thought that the Mother Country should back up the Colonies in their endeavours to protect bird life. There was a very good chance of getting the Bill through quickly if the Government saw that public opinion demanded it.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle seconded the resolution, and said that it had been urged against the Bill that it would put some people out of business. That was what they wanted. If some people had not got a decent business they ought to be put out of it.

The resolution was carried unanimously.


Full Report




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