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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

The End

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The End is a poem written by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in the collected volume Songs of the Road on 16 march 1911.



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The End

"Tell me what to get and I will get it."
"Then get that picture — that — the girl in white."
"Now tell me where you wish that I should set it."
"Lean it where I can see it — in the light."


"If there is more, sir, you have but to say it."
"Then bring those letters — those which lie apart."
"Here is the packet! Tell me where to lay it."
"Stoop over, nurse, and lay it on my heart."


"Thanks for your silence, nurse! You understand me!
And now I'll try to manage for myself.
But, as you go, I'll trouble you to hand me
The small blue bottle there upon the shelf.


"And so farewell! I feel that I am keeping
The sunlight from you; may your walk be bright!
When you return I may perchance be sleeping,
So, ere you go, one hand-clasp and good night!"




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