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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, KStJ, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

The Great Problem and the Evidence for its Solution

From The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia

The Great Problem (1928)
The Great Problem (dedication)
The Great Problem (appreciation)

The Great Problem and the Evidence for its Solution is a book written by George Lindsay Johnson published in 1928 by Hutchinson & Co. including an appreciation written by Arthur Conan Doyle.



Dedication

To Sir Oliver Lodge, the late Sir William Barrett, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Professor Richet, the late Professor Flammarion, the Rev. Charles Tweedale, Mr. Stanley de Brath, the late Miss F. R. Scatcherd and all those noble men and women who have risked their scientific or literary reputation by declaring and upholding what they know and feel to be the truth this work is dedicated by the author


Appreciation by Arthur Conan Doyle

AN APPRECIATION

DR. LINDSAY JOHNSON'S book has amazed me. I don't remember in all my reading having encountered so much learning of various sorts converged from different angles upon one subject. As that subject is far the most important one in the world, it is not an exaggeration to say that the appearance of such a book is a matter for congratulation to the whole human race. We have all to die and nothing more informative, and, I may add, more consoling upon the nature of death has ever appeared.

A glance at the letters behind Dr. Lindsay Johnson's name will give some idea of his academic distinctions, but rare as such credentials may be, it is far rarer to find a man who can handle his learning so usefully, so gracefully, making each subject illustrate the other, and weaving all into one harmonious pattern. On one page he speaks as a man of pure science, in another as a learned physician, in another as an experienced psychic researcher, in another as an authority upon comparative religion, and yet all is lightened by graceful literary and poetical allusions which show a man of wide general reading with a retentive memory and a remarkable gift for selection.

I feel it is an honour to help in any way towards the production or reception of so fine a work.

ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE.
Bignell Wood,
Minstead, Lyndhurst.
May, 1927.



















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