The Arthur Conan Doyle EncyclopediaThe Arthur Conan Doyle EncyclopediaThe Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia
22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

The Taxicab Mystery

From The Arthur Conan Doyle Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
The Moving Picture World, 28 january 1911, p. 210

The Taxi Cab Mystery is an American silent movie released on 30 january 1911, produced by Yankee Film Co. Black & White.

With The Italian Sherlock Holmes.

Survival status: unknown.


Cast

  • Petrosio, the detective : Mr. Krohner
  • ? : Mayme Gardner


Plot summary / Reviews

  • The Moving Picture World, 28 january 1911, p. 206
The Moving Picture World, 28 january 1911, p. 206

THE TAXICAB MYSTERY. - In "The Taxicab Mystery" we have written and produced one of the season's sensations, not only because it tells a tale of unusual interest, but at all times leaves the audience in suspense, waiting for the clever sleuth to solve the mystery.

He is aided by a pretty stenographer who, in one scene, climbs to the transom and breaks the glass with her slipper to allow the deadly fumes of gas to escape.

The chase, through New York's busy streets, is both novel and thrilling, in fact every scene is a distinct departure from those usually seen in moving pictures. The part of Petrosio, detective, is played by Mr. Krohner, who is familiar to our friends as "The Italian Sherlock Holmes." A strong cast supports Mr. Krohner, including Mayme Gardner, late star of "Death Valley," and other prominent players.




  • The Moving Picture World, 11 february 1911, p. 318
The Moving Picture World, 11 february 1911, p. 318

"The Taxicab Mystery" (Yankee). — A good, healthy detective story is not half bad, but the audience must accept it as a detective story and it is well known that most of them are more or less improbable. The chief novelty in this one lies, perhaps, in the fact that the audience has no means of guessing what the solution of the mystery may be until the film closes. Often they are too transparent to be really interesting. It isn't particularly good to watch a plot worked out after it has been guessed. This company has succeeded in leaving the denouement to the last, a feature which has added materially to its interest. The audience liked it. That was plainly evident.





© arthur-conan-doyle.com