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22 May 1859, Edinburgh M.D., Kt, D.L., LL.D., Sportsman, Writer, Poet, Politician, Justicer, Spiritualist Crowborough, 7 July 1930

Vincent Starrett

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Vincent Starrett
Vincent Starrett in Beijing (dedicated to Christopher Morley)

Charles Vincent Emerson Starrett (26 october 1886 - 5 january 1974) was an American writer and newspaperman known for his sherlockian studies and biography of Sherlock Holmes (The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes).



Sherlockian bibliography

Also:

  • In Re: Sherlock Holmes, by August Derleth (1945, Mycroft and Moran) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • The Adventures / The Later Adventures / The Final Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1950, The Heritage Press) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • The Painful Predicament of Sherlock Holmes, a fantasy in one act, by William Gillette (1955, Ben Abramson) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • Sherlock Holmes in Portrait and Profile, by Walter Klinefelter (1963, Syracuse Univ. Press) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • The Whole Art of Detection by Sherlock Holmes, by John Bennett Shaw (1968?, Black Cat Press) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • The Casebook of Solar Pons, by August Derleth (1965, Mycroft and Moran) Foreword by Vincent Starrett
  • The Exploits of Solar Pons, by August Derleth (1975, Robson Books) Introduction by Vincent Starrett
  • Sherlock Holmes; a play, wherein is set forth The Strange Case of Miss Alice Faulkner, by Gillette, William (1974, Helan Halbach) Introduction by Vincent Starrett


His 221B poem

Here dwell together still two men of note
Who never lived and so can never die:
How very near they seem, yet how remote
That age before the world went all awry.
But still the game's afoot for those with ears
Attuned to catch the distant view-halloo:
England is England yet, for all our fears--
Only those things the heart believes are true.
A yellow fog swirls past the window-pane
As night descends upon this fabled street:
A lonely hansom splashes through the rain,
The ghostly gas lamps fail at twenty feet.
Here, though the world explode, these two survive,
And it is always eighteen ninety-five.





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